Medication 101: Ventolin

It’s be a while since I have done a Medication 101 so I am going to try and pop a few out now.

I’ve been taking Ventolin for nearly 3 years now, since June 2012. I’ve taken Ventolin through 2 different devices, the Ventolin Evohaler which is the typical aerosol inhaler that most people are familiar with, and then I also used the Ventolin Accuhaler for a short period from January 2013 to October 2013.

Ventolin is a brand name for Salbutamol [AKA Albuterol in the US] which is a Short Acting Beta 2 antagonist (SABA) or in layman terms a fast acting reliever inhaler. It is used to to relieve spasms in the smooth muscle around the airways which produces asthma symptoms/bronchospasm [cough, wheeze, tight chest, shortness of breath]. Most people with asthma are treated with a reliever inhaler and a preventer inhaler, and it is very important to be aware of which inhaler is your reliever. The reliever inhaler is the inhaler that is going to help you out when you are experiencing symptoms or having an attack. [Note; some people use a SMART or MART regimes, please always use your inhalers as directed by your doctor. This is simply to provide general information about Ventolin].

Doses:

The dose of Ventolin is variable. The Ventolin Evohaler contains 100mcg of Salbutamol per accusation and the Ventolin Accuhaler contains 200mcg of Salbutamol per accusation. Most people take 100-200mcg of Ventolin to relieve symptoms but may take up to 1000mcg when needed. Please phone an ambulance ASAP if your symptoms are not easing even after taking your inhaler, or if you don’t have your inhaler with you. Asthma can be very serious, don’t mess around with it.

Precautions:

Consult your doctor before you take Ventolin if you are hypersensitive to Salbutamol Sulphate or HFA 134a which is the aerosol in the Ventolin Evohaler.

Special care is also advised to be taken when taking the Ventolin Evohaler if you have high blood pressure, have an overactive thyroid or have a history of heart problem including angina or an irregular heart rhythm. Please consult a doctor or pharmacist if you call under any of those categories.

Side effects:

I have starred [*] all the side effects I have experienced when taking Ventolin.

  • Allergic reactions [affecting less than 1 in 10,000 people] – Please seek medical attention ASAP if you experience swelling of the face, lips tongue or throat, if you have difficulty with breathing, if you have difficulty swallowing, if you develop an itchy rash, if you feel faint, feel light headed or collapse.
  • Common side effects [affecting less than 1 in 10 people] – Headache*, feeling shaky*, heart palpitations* [please consult doctor about this].
  • Uncommon side effects [affecting less than 1 in 100 people] – mouth and throat irritation, muscle cramps*
  • Rare side effects [affecting less than 1 in 1,000 people] – low blood potassium levels, peripheral dilation [increased blood flow to extremities]
  • Very rare side effects [affecting less than 1 in 10,000 people] – changes in sleep patterns, changes in behaviour [e.g. restlessness, excitability

I have found that Ventolin/Salbutamol has got me out of some sticky situations but if you find that you aren’t responding to your reliever inhaler any more or you are still having issues with your asthma after taking you inhaler, go to the hospital. Don’t hang around because you aren’t sure if your symptoms are bad enough to seek medical advice. Asthma can be life threatening so be pro-active!

Source:
Patient information leaflet.

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